What do you want to know about script coverage?

Tim Robbins in The PlayerMy alma mater, TheFilmSchool, has asked me to speak about script coverage and analysis and how screenwriters can improve their chances to receive a “Recommend” (Tues., Aug. 6), and to help me organize the discussion I thought I’d put the question to you: What exactly do you want to know about coverage?

Script coverage — a story analysis for producers that often includes grades of “Pass,” “Consider” or “Recommend” — is a critical step in helping producers determine whether a story is worth their investment of time and money. Likewise, coverage helps agents and managers determine which screenwriters to represent and which screenplays to pitch to studios or to attract A-list actors and directors.

Your Screenplay Sucks!: 100 Ways to Make It Great (Paperback)


List Price: $19.95 USD
New From: $11.17 USD In Stock
Used from: $5.41 USD In Stock

Coverage is not limited to screenplays: Graphic novels, manuscripts, stage plays and other creative expressions all are subject to similar industry scrutiny. Learn more about the mysterious and seemingly arbitrary process of coverage and gain industry insights that will help you understand how to best present your material in the highly competitive marketplace.

Submit your question for this free and informative event
Submit your question below in the comments area or via my contact form, and after the event I’ll summarize the discussion in a separate post.

First Tuesdays with TheFilmSchool are free events that speak to the core of storytelling — the essence of programs offered by the school co-founded by “Rebel Without A Cause” writer Stewart Stern and actor/director Tom Skerritt.

Story: Substance, Structure, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting (Hardcover)


List Price: $40.00 USD
New From: $15.99 USD In Stock
Used from: $11.49 USD In Stock

“Story: Substance, Structure, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting,” by Robert McKee, and “Your Screenplay Sucks!: 100 Ways to Make It Great,” by William M. Akers, are among the two books I highly recommend to anyone interested in screenwriting.

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